Alerts: Biological Hazards

2015-06-25 03:45:52 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150625-48822-USA
Date&Time: 2015-06-25 03:45:52 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of New Mexico,
Location: East Mountain,
City: Tramway

Description:
Two confirmed cases of tularemia in dogs in the East Mountains have the Albuquerque Environmental Health Department issuing a warning to residents east of Tramway. “It is a bacteria that causes disease in rodents, rabbits, dogs and cats,” said Albuquerque Environmental Health Manager Dr. Paul Smith. It’s very similar to the plague, and on top of that, the plague is also a concern in the East Mountains as well and is transmitted through fleas. Recent rains and heat are the culprits. “So there’s a lot more food and shelter for those rodents’ increasing populations, increasing incidents of disease as well,” said Smith. Here’s how the plague and tularemia can go from all those rodents to you. Free-roaming pets hunting or eating infected rodents can contract the disease and bring it directly into your home. It’ll make your pet and you extremely ill very suddenly. “You’re almost completely incapacitated with the high fever, muscle aches and pains that go along with that,” said Dr. Smith. Dr. Paul Smith recommends some simple steps to reduce your risk of contracting disease. Keep your pets from roaming freely and hunting rodents. Clean up your yard near your house, especially areas where rodents could live, such as wood and brush piles, junk and abandoned vehicles. Also, do not handle sick or dead wildlife – they could be infected. Avoid mowing over dead animals because this could potentially aerosolize the bacteria. If you or your pet become infected, get medical help immediately. “Both diseases can be life-threatening if they are left untreated,” said Dr. Smith.

The name of Hazard: Tularemia (dogs)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed

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2015-06-25 03:43:21 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150625-48821-USA
Date&Time: 2015-06-25 03:43:21 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of North Carolina,
Location: Coastal region,
City: Surf City
Number of injured people: 1


Description:
An 8-year-old boy was attacked by a shark on Wednesday in Surf City, North Carolina. He suffered minor leg and foot injuries from what appeared to be a small bite and was taken to the hospital by his parents, the Surf City Police Department confirmed to PEOPLE. Not even two weeks ago, 12-year-old Kiersten Yow and 16-year-old Hunter Treschl were attacked by sharks in Oak Island, North Carolina, within 90 minutes of each other. The Oak Island incident happened about 60 miles away from today’s attack. Yow, who lost her arm below her elbow, is improving with each day at the hospital. Treschl has since been released from the hospital after he lost his arm below the shoulder. Shark expert Larry Cahoon told PEOPLE that despite the recent shark attacks, beachgoers shouldn’t avoid the ocean. “You have a higher chance of getting into a car accident driving to the beach than you do getting attacked by a shark when you get there,” Cahoon, professor of biology and marine biology at the University of North Carolina, Wilmington, says. “The fact is that sharks have millions of contact hours with humans on beaches every year, yet attacks are really rare. Just be smart.” “Sharks are frightened of us,” he adds. “They normally will only attack us if they mistake us for their typical prey, like skate and rays.” But when they do attack, just swim back to shore as fast as you can, he advises. “People say to swim slowly back to shore, but what is that going to do? Swim to shore as fast as you can – a shark that means to eat you will keep coming. You need to call for help. People who survive all but the least damaging shark attacks got immediate help from others,” he says. “Basically, don’t swim alone in shark waters.” And when it comes to fending off a shark, Cahoon says punching it in the nose, gills or eyes won’t do much good. “A 10-foot bull shark will weigh close to 500 pounds and is essentially all muscle. What chance would anyone have?” says Cahoon. “You won’t be thinking rationally even if you have the opportunity to punch it, so just focus on getting back to land.”

The name of Hazard: Shark attack (non-fatal)

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2015-02-25 12:35:17 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150225-47119-USA
Date&Time: 2015-02-25 12:35:17 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Washington,
Location: ,
City: Ocean Shores

Description:
The state Fish and Wildlife Department is alerting people along the coast that a great white shark is operating in nearby waters.

A harbor seal washed up at Ocean Shores recently having been partially devoured by a great white. The tourist town has a pretty good sense of humor when it comes to great whites. There’s a tourist shop where you pass through the jaws of one. But now word is surfacing that a great white is operating in those waters. Last Thursday a freshly killed harbor seal was found on the beach. Wildlife folks knew it had been bitten by something really big. The seal was sent to California for a necropsy and word came back confirming it was a great white. “I would stay out of the water for awhile,” said Craig Bartlett of DFW. “And we’re contacting local and tribal governments today to let them know what we’ve found.” Ocean Shores police say they just got word that it was a great white, but so far there are no plans to do anything at the beach. “That would be kind of terrifying,” said tourist Edith Laurent. “It would be frightening out there to have a shark come in. No thank you.” Thanks to Hollywood and the 1975 film “Jaws” everyone knows what a great white looks like. But business people we talked to don’t believe there’ll be widespread panic as word gets out. Just the opposite. “I think more people are going to want to come out and think ‘oh can we see a great white shark,’ ” said kite shop owner Andy Siass. California has seen its share of shark attacks — a surfer was bitten by a great white two months ago on the central coast. Last summer, a swimmer at a southern California beach was attacked. Both survived. But there have been no reports of any attacks here in the last 26 years. But it has people keeping an eye out. “The idea of sharks off our coast a little bit disturbing,” said tourist Robert Laurent. Police say they advise people stay out of the water anyway — not because of any shark, but because of the dangerous rip tides. A second seal found over the weekend did not die from a shark attack. The Fish and Wildlife folks say it died from a gaff hook to the head.

The name of Hazard: Giant White Shark danger
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed

Posted:2015-02-25 12:35:17 [UTC]