ENENews: Gov’t: “This is unprecedented in extent and magnitude”


Gov’t: “This is unprecedented in extent and magnitude”… toxic bloom may stretch from Calif. to Alaska — Largest event ever recorded? — Official: “It’s new territory… we’ve never had to close essentially half our coast” — Fish washing up “extremely poisonous” — “Serious concern for coastal communities”
Published: June 16th, 2015 at 2:47 am ET
By ENENews
http://enenews.com/govt-unprecedented-toxic-bloom-west-coast-largest-event-recorded

NOAA Fisheries (pdf), Jun 15, 2015 (emphasis added): NOAA Fisheries mobilizes to gauge unprecedented West Coast toxic algal bloom [that] spans much of the West Coast and has triggered numerous closures of important shellfish fisheries… The bloom stretches from the Central California Coast north to Washington and possibly Alaska…


Seattle Times, Jun 15, 2015: Toxic algae bloom might be largest ever — Scientists onboard a NOAA research vessel are beginning a survey of what could be the largest toxic algae bloom ever recorded off the West Coast… At the same time, two other types of toxins rarely seen in combination are turning up,,, along the Washington coast… the toxin has never hit so hard in the spring, or required such widespread closures for crabs… concentrations in California anchovies this year [are] as high as any ever measured… [Dan Ayres with Washington’s Dept. of Fish & Wildlife] recently spotted a sea lion wracked by seizures… collapsed into a fetal position and quivered… Domoic-acid contamination is rare in Puget Sound, but several beds have been closed this year because of… paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and a relatively new threat called diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). The first confirmed case of DSP poisoning in the United States occurred in 2011 [in Washington]… 2015 is the first time regulators have detected dangerous levels of PSP, DSP and domoic acid in the state at the same time — and in some cases, in the same places…

USA Today, Jun 15, 2015: Toxic algae bloom closes fisheries from Calif. to Washington
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/06/15/west-coast-algae-bloom-red-tide/28782405/

USA Today, Jun 15, 2015: Toxic algae bloom may stretch from California to Alaska
http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/environment/2015/06/15/west-coast-toxic-algae-bloom/71264756/

Half Moon Bay Review, Jun 11, 2015: Potentially toxic fish wash ashore… “the event sounds similar to what I’ve experienced in Moss Landing Harbor,” said Chris Scholin, president of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. “And the level of poison in the fish here is the highest concentration ever recorded… since the issue was first discovered… We don’t know if the fish have actually succumbed to the toxins but have found that the fish are extremely poisonous“… Scholin’s team in Monterey has observed dead birds.

Vera Trainer, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center (pdf): “This is unprecedented in terms of the extent and magnitude.”
More from Trainer: “We’re seeing multiple toxins at the same time… high levels of domoic acid [and] a coastwide bloom — those are indications that this is unprecedented.”
Eileen Sobeck, NOAA (pdf): “[It’s] a serious concern for coastal communities… The better we understand what’s happening… the better we can address the impacts.”
Raphael Kudela, UCSC ocean scientist: “By collecting data over the full West Coast… we will have a much better idea of… what is causing it, and why this year… This is possibly the largest event spatially that we’ve ever recorded.”
Jerry Borchert, Washington’s marine biotoxin coordinator: “It all really started early this year… This has been a really bad year overall for biotoxins.”
Dan Ayres, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife: “This is new territory for us… We’ve never had to close essentially half our coast.”
See also: California cientists warning of mass die-off — Official: Seafloor littered with dead fish, washing up “far as I could see” — Toxin spreading all up and down West Coast (VIDEO)

A Student at Palomar College in San Marcos is Recovering From Meningococcal Bacteria

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San Marcos

2014-10-24 03:59:36 – Biological Hazard – USA

 
EDIS Code: BH-20141024-45746-USA
Date&Time: 2014-10-24 03:59:36 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of California,
Location: Palomar College,
City: San Marcos
Number of infected people: 2

Not confirmed information!

Event location map <!–AlertMap–>
Description:
County health officials announced Thursday that a student at Palomar College in San Marcos is recovering from meningococcal bacteria, but there is no known connection between the unidentified patient and a San Diego State University freshman who died Saturday of the bacterial disease. No one at the community college has reported close contact with the student, who attended only one class in the past three weeks, according to the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency. By comparison, county health officials had been concerned about the possible exposure of several hundred students at SDSU, because Sara Stelzer was involved with a sorority and attended two fraternity parties a few days before she displayed symptoms. “The risk to individuals who have not had close contact with the infected individual is very low,” said Dr. Dean Sidelinger, of the county’s Public Health Services. “Meningococcal disease is spread through close contact with the person infected, but others should be aware of the symptoms so that they may seek care if they develop these symptoms.” There have been seven previous cases of meningococcal disease reported in San Diego County so far this year — including two deaths. Last year, there were 16 cases. Since 2005, an average of 11 cases have been reported each year in the region. Symptoms may include fever, intense headache, lethargy, stiff neck, and a rash that does not blanch under pressure. Anyone with potential exposure who develops any of the symptoms should immediately contact a healthcare provider or emergency room for evaluation of possible meningococcal disease. The bacteria can be spread through close contact, such as sharing drinking glasses, eating utensils, cigarettes or water bottles. It can also be spread by kissing, smoking and living in close quarters. The time between exposure to the disease and the onset of symptoms can be between two to 10 days. Individuals who had close contact with a meningitis patient should receive antibiotics to prevent any possible infection, health officials said. Preventive antibiotics are not recommended for people who were not in close contact with the case, but they should be aware of possible symptoms and make sure they have received the recommended vaccination against the disease.
The name of Hazard: Meningitis (bacterial)
Species: Human
Status: Confirmed