AlertsUSA Reports of Numerous States Having Rabies, and Wyoming a Killer Bird Flu

RSOE EDIS
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Budapest, Hungary

RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-03-28 06:43:09 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150328-47528-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-28 06:43:09 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of New Jersey,
Location: Cumberland COunty,
City: Deerfield
Number of infected people: 2

Description:
Two people were exposed to rabies Sunday in Deerfield Township after they touched an open wound on a duck, which was bitten by a raccoon. Although ducks cannot contract rabies – only mammals can – touching wounds with bare hands can result in transmission of the virus, the Cumberland County Health Department said. The two people were treated with rabies post-exposure preventive medication, the department said. Rabies is almost certainly fatal if left untreated. Rabies is most commonly spread through a bite, but it can be spread by saliva touching the eyes, mouth or nose. The rabies virus is mainly found in wild skunks, raccoons, cats or dogs. Animals that are infected usually appear unstable with a wobbly walk, foaming at the mouth, or excessively drooling saliva. Wild animals that appear friendly and unafraid of humans may be infected – just as those that show aggressive behavior may be. The health department said to never approach a wild animal displaying any symptoms and to call local Animal Control if you see one. The health department announced a rabies clinic schedule, where residents of any municipality that is covered by the department can have their pets vaccinated at no charge. A fee of $10 will apply to anyone living outside that jurisdiction, which includes Vineland. The first clinic takes place Saturday at Cumberland County Fairgrounds on Carmel Road in Millville from 9 a.m. to noon.rn

The name of Hazard: Rabies (raccoon-human)
Species: Spread
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-28 06:43:09 [UTC]
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2015-03-27 04:52:08 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150327-47508-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-27 04:52:08 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of California,
Location: Alameda County,
City:

Description:
A fourth bat found in Alameda County has tested positive for rabies, local health officials announced last week. The bat was found March 14 in Sunol, said Sherri Willis, a spokeswoman for Alameda County Public Health Department. Three other bats found since March 6 in the Fremont area have tested positive for the virus. The first bat was found dead March 6 in the city’s Irvington neighborhood near the entrance to the Wally Pond Irvington Community Center at 41885 Blacow Road, police said. In another case, a dog picked up a bat March 13 near the Niles Elementary School playground. Police said that the dog’s owner took it home and brought it to the Tri-City Animal Shelter, where it was tested the next Monday. Officials did not have any information about when or where the third bat was discovered. The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death, according to the Centers for Disease Control. It’s passed by touching the saliva or brain tissue of an infected animal or being bitten by one.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (bat)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-27 04:52:08 [UTC]
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2015-03-27 04:41:56 – Biological Hazard – USA
EDIS Code: BH-20150327-47505-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-27 04:41:56 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Texas,
Location: ,
City: Bellmead

Description:
A second skunk within a a month has tested positive for rabies in Bellmead, officials announced Thursday. Officials responded to a call Wednesday morning in the 900 block of Hogan Lane to find a skunk behaving erratically, said Bellmead police Detective Kory Martin. The animal was killed on the spot and sent for testing, the results of which returned Thursday. The afternoon of March 10, another skunk tested positive for rabies after a Bellmead animal control officer was bitten trying to capture the animal in the 200 block of San Pedro Street. Martin has said the skunk bit the officer’s finger before it tested positive for rabies. The officer was expected to be OK, as he had already received a pre-exposure vaccination for rabies after a stray cat bit him earlier this year, Martin said.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (skunk)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-27 04:41:56 [UTC]
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2015-03-27 04:37:38 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150327-47503-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-27 04:37:38 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Florida,
Location: Sarasota County,
City:

Description:
On Thursday, the Florida Department of Health in Sarasota County issued a rabies alert. The agency confirms a goat had been infected, and has been euthanized. According to veterinarians who treated the goat, the attacking animal was not large, and likely a raccoon or fox. The rabies alert covers an area within a 1.5-mile radius of Honore Avenue and Bahia Vista Street in Sarasota. That area spans north of Bahia Vista Street to Fruitville Road, south of Bahia Vista to Bee Ridge Road, east of Honore Avenue to Apex Road, and west of Honore to McIntosh Road. The alert will last for 60 days. Health officials ask you to maintain heightened awareness that rabies is active in Sarasota County. Pet owners in the area should not leave their pet’s food outside, and keep pets on a leash at all times.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (goat)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-27 04:37:38 [UTC]

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Bird Flu

2015-03-27 04:53:56 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150327-47509-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-27 04:53:56 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Wyoming,
Location: Near to Cheyenne,
City:

Description:
Wyoming state officials received confirmation on Wednesday that the highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza strain was identified in a Canada goose found near Cheyenne, Wyoming. This is the first detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in Wyoming. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department and the State Veterinarian ask that people continue to be on the lookout for birds that may exhibit symptoms of the disease and advise that those handling birds or who own birds should exercise caution. Avian influenza (commonly called “bird flu”) is a viral infection found in a wide variety of domestic and wild birds. The highly pathogenic forms of the disease (HPAI) are highly contagious among birds and can result in high mortality rates in affected domestic flocks. Clinical signs in affected birds may include edema or swelling of the head, nasal discharge, neurologic signs (circling, incoordination), depression or sudden death. HPAI has been confirmed in eleven states, including Wyoming, in wild and/or domestic birds. The disease has not been implicated in any human infection in the US, to date. Officials say there is no immediate human health concern due to the virus as long as sanitation precautions are taken. Proper handling and cooking includes routine precautions like wearing latex or rubber gloves when cleaning birds, washing hands with soapy water after cleaning, cleaning and disinfecting equipment and surfaces that come in contact with wild birds (for example, washing with soapy water and disinfecting with a 10 percent chlorine bleach solution), and cooking wild birds thoroughly before eating the meat. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that birds are safe to eat as long as they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees. Affected birds have now been found in the Pacific, Central, and Mississippi flyways where wild bird migrations occur. Most of Wyoming is located in the Central flyway, with a small portion in the Pacific Flyway west of the continental divide, Domestic flocks associated with this outbreak have reported high mortality with very few noticeable clinical signs prior to death.rnrn”Over the past several months highly pathogenic strains of the Avian Influenza virus have been found in wild birds and domestic poultry in several new states including Wyoming,” said State Veterinarian, Jim Logan. “We believe it is best if domestic poultry owners – commercial and backyard flocks – take precautions to prevent their birds from having any contact or exposure with wild birds. Avian influenza can be transmitted to domestic bird flocks from infected wild birds. We also advise domestic poultry owners to institute good biosecurity practices to prevent bringing pathogens into their facilities.” These measures include: wearing clean clothes, washing hands and disinfecting footwear before entering any bird area. Additional biosecurity practices include: disinfecting equipment and tools, cleaning cages regularly, changing food and water daily are recommended to limit disease transmission within flocks. Information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov. While most avian influenza viruses rarely cause clinical signs in wild waterfowl, it appears that raptors and wild gallinaceous birds (pheasants, quail, turkey, grouse) may be more susceptible to disease from HPAI. Game and Fish recommends that falconers avoid hunting avian species, particularly waterfowl, during this HPAI outbreak. Game bird farmers are advised to follow the same precautions as outlined for domestic poultry.

The name of Hazard: H5N2 (highly pathogenic avian influenza virus)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-27 04:53:56 [UTC]

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More Hazards in Texas!

RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary

RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL

2014-10-17 04:32:00 – Biological Hazard – USA

!!! WARNING !!!

EDIS Code: BH-20141017-45671-USA
Date&Time: 2014-10-17 04:32:00 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Texas,
Location: Clear Lake Regional Medical Center,
City: Webster
Number of infected people: 1

Not confirmed information!

Event location map
Description:
A man in Texas is being tested and monitored for an outbreak virus found overseas, but it’s not Ebola. Health officials at Clear Lake Regional Medical Center in Webster, TX say they are treating a patient with a suspected case of the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). According to Kurt Koopmann, public information officer for the Galveston County Health District, the patient, a man in his 70s, had recently traveled to the Arabian Peninsula. Currently laboratory analysis on the patients’s samples is pending. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is viral respiratory illness first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. It is caused by a coronavirus called MERS-CoV. Most people who have been confirmed to have MERS-CoV infection developed severe acute respiratory illness. They had fever, cough, and shortness of breath. About 30% of people confirmed to have MERS-CoV infection have died. So far, all the cases have been linked to countries in and near the Arabian Peninsula. To date, there has been two imported MERS cases in the US, one in Indiana and one in Florida. According to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Since April 2012 and as of 9 October 2014, 892 cases of MERS-CoV have been reported by local health authorities worldwide, including 356 deaths.

The name of Hazard: MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus)
Species: Human
Status: Suspected

Posted:2014-10-17 04:32:00 [UTC]