Alerts USA: Fleas in Arizona with Bubonic Plague

2015-04-03 03:19:13 – Biological Hazard – USA


EDIS Code: BH-20150403-47603-USA
Date&Time: 2015-04-03 03:19:13 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Arizona,
Location: Picture Canyon,
City:

Description:
County resident are urged to take precautions with the discovery of fleas carrying the plague near Picture Canyon. According to information from the Coconino County Health Services District, staff periodically collects and tests flea samples throughout the county. The samples recently collected from Picture Canyon, a popular hiking area east of North Highway 89 and north of Interstate 40, were tested by NAU’s Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics. After the fleas tested positive for plague, county and city staff notified nearby residents of the situation and posted signs at the trailheads. The flea burrows are being treated, and the area will be closely monitored to determine if further action is required. The positive test is the first evidence of plague activity for the year in the county. The health department is urging the public to take precautions to reduce risk of exposure to themselves and pets. The disease can be transmitted to humans and other animals by the bite of an infected flea, or by direct contact with an infected animal.

The name of Hazard: Plague (pleas)
Symptoms: Symptoms appear within two to six days after exposure: Fever,Chills,Headache,Weakness,Muscle pain,Swollen lymph glands in the groin, armpits or limbs.
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed

Posted:2015-04-03 03:19:13 [UTC]

AlertsUSA Reports of Numerous States Having Rabies, and Wyoming a Killer Bird Flu

RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary

RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2015-03-28 06:43:09 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150328-47528-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-28 06:43:09 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of New Jersey,
Location: Cumberland COunty,
City: Deerfield
Number of infected people: 2

Description:
Two people were exposed to rabies Sunday in Deerfield Township after they touched an open wound on a duck, which was bitten by a raccoon. Although ducks cannot contract rabies – only mammals can – touching wounds with bare hands can result in transmission of the virus, the Cumberland County Health Department said. The two people were treated with rabies post-exposure preventive medication, the department said. Rabies is almost certainly fatal if left untreated. Rabies is most commonly spread through a bite, but it can be spread by saliva touching the eyes, mouth or nose. The rabies virus is mainly found in wild skunks, raccoons, cats or dogs. Animals that are infected usually appear unstable with a wobbly walk, foaming at the mouth, or excessively drooling saliva. Wild animals that appear friendly and unafraid of humans may be infected – just as those that show aggressive behavior may be. The health department said to never approach a wild animal displaying any symptoms and to call local Animal Control if you see one. The health department announced a rabies clinic schedule, where residents of any municipality that is covered by the department can have their pets vaccinated at no charge. A fee of $10 will apply to anyone living outside that jurisdiction, which includes Vineland. The first clinic takes place Saturday at Cumberland County Fairgrounds on Carmel Road in Millville from 9 a.m. to noon.rn

The name of Hazard: Rabies (raccoon-human)
Species: Spread
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-28 06:43:09 [UTC]
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2015-03-27 04:52:08 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150327-47508-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-27 04:52:08 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of California,
Location: Alameda County,
City:

Description:
A fourth bat found in Alameda County has tested positive for rabies, local health officials announced last week. The bat was found March 14 in Sunol, said Sherri Willis, a spokeswoman for Alameda County Public Health Department. Three other bats found since March 6 in the Fremont area have tested positive for the virus. The first bat was found dead March 6 in the city’s Irvington neighborhood near the entrance to the Wally Pond Irvington Community Center at 41885 Blacow Road, police said. In another case, a dog picked up a bat March 13 near the Niles Elementary School playground. Police said that the dog’s owner took it home and brought it to the Tri-City Animal Shelter, where it was tested the next Monday. Officials did not have any information about when or where the third bat was discovered. The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death, according to the Centers for Disease Control. It’s passed by touching the saliva or brain tissue of an infected animal or being bitten by one.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (bat)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-27 04:52:08 [UTC]
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2015-03-27 04:41:56 – Biological Hazard – USA
EDIS Code: BH-20150327-47505-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-27 04:41:56 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Texas,
Location: ,
City: Bellmead

Description:
A second skunk within a a month has tested positive for rabies in Bellmead, officials announced Thursday. Officials responded to a call Wednesday morning in the 900 block of Hogan Lane to find a skunk behaving erratically, said Bellmead police Detective Kory Martin. The animal was killed on the spot and sent for testing, the results of which returned Thursday. The afternoon of March 10, another skunk tested positive for rabies after a Bellmead animal control officer was bitten trying to capture the animal in the 200 block of San Pedro Street. Martin has said the skunk bit the officer’s finger before it tested positive for rabies. The officer was expected to be OK, as he had already received a pre-exposure vaccination for rabies after a stray cat bit him earlier this year, Martin said.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (skunk)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-27 04:41:56 [UTC]
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2015-03-27 04:37:38 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150327-47503-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-27 04:37:38 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Florida,
Location: Sarasota County,
City:

Description:
On Thursday, the Florida Department of Health in Sarasota County issued a rabies alert. The agency confirms a goat had been infected, and has been euthanized. According to veterinarians who treated the goat, the attacking animal was not large, and likely a raccoon or fox. The rabies alert covers an area within a 1.5-mile radius of Honore Avenue and Bahia Vista Street in Sarasota. That area spans north of Bahia Vista Street to Fruitville Road, south of Bahia Vista to Bee Ridge Road, east of Honore Avenue to Apex Road, and west of Honore to McIntosh Road. The alert will last for 60 days. Health officials ask you to maintain heightened awareness that rabies is active in Sarasota County. Pet owners in the area should not leave their pet’s food outside, and keep pets on a leash at all times.

The name of Hazard: Rabies (goat)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-27 04:37:38 [UTC]

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Bird Flu

2015-03-27 04:53:56 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20150327-47509-USA
Date&Time: 2015-03-27 04:53:56 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Wyoming,
Location: Near to Cheyenne,
City:

Description:
Wyoming state officials received confirmation on Wednesday that the highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza strain was identified in a Canada goose found near Cheyenne, Wyoming. This is the first detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in Wyoming. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department and the State Veterinarian ask that people continue to be on the lookout for birds that may exhibit symptoms of the disease and advise that those handling birds or who own birds should exercise caution. Avian influenza (commonly called “bird flu”) is a viral infection found in a wide variety of domestic and wild birds. The highly pathogenic forms of the disease (HPAI) are highly contagious among birds and can result in high mortality rates in affected domestic flocks. Clinical signs in affected birds may include edema or swelling of the head, nasal discharge, neurologic signs (circling, incoordination), depression or sudden death. HPAI has been confirmed in eleven states, including Wyoming, in wild and/or domestic birds. The disease has not been implicated in any human infection in the US, to date. Officials say there is no immediate human health concern due to the virus as long as sanitation precautions are taken. Proper handling and cooking includes routine precautions like wearing latex or rubber gloves when cleaning birds, washing hands with soapy water after cleaning, cleaning and disinfecting equipment and surfaces that come in contact with wild birds (for example, washing with soapy water and disinfecting with a 10 percent chlorine bleach solution), and cooking wild birds thoroughly before eating the meat. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that birds are safe to eat as long as they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees. Affected birds have now been found in the Pacific, Central, and Mississippi flyways where wild bird migrations occur. Most of Wyoming is located in the Central flyway, with a small portion in the Pacific Flyway west of the continental divide, Domestic flocks associated with this outbreak have reported high mortality with very few noticeable clinical signs prior to death.rnrn”Over the past several months highly pathogenic strains of the Avian Influenza virus have been found in wild birds and domestic poultry in several new states including Wyoming,” said State Veterinarian, Jim Logan. “We believe it is best if domestic poultry owners – commercial and backyard flocks – take precautions to prevent their birds from having any contact or exposure with wild birds. Avian influenza can be transmitted to domestic bird flocks from infected wild birds. We also advise domestic poultry owners to institute good biosecurity practices to prevent bringing pathogens into their facilities.” These measures include: wearing clean clothes, washing hands and disinfecting footwear before entering any bird area. Additional biosecurity practices include: disinfecting equipment and tools, cleaning cages regularly, changing food and water daily are recommended to limit disease transmission within flocks. Information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov. While most avian influenza viruses rarely cause clinical signs in wild waterfowl, it appears that raptors and wild gallinaceous birds (pheasants, quail, turkey, grouse) may be more susceptible to disease from HPAI. Game and Fish recommends that falconers avoid hunting avian species, particularly waterfowl, during this HPAI outbreak. Game bird farmers are advised to follow the same precautions as outlined for domestic poultry.

The name of Hazard: H5N2 (highly pathogenic avian influenza virus)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed
Posted:2015-03-27 04:53:56 [UTC]

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AlertsUSA for Malaysia, Dengue Fever

RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary

RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL

2015-02-24 04:33:19 – Biological Hazard – Malaysia

EDIS Code: BH-20150224-47102-MYS
Date&Time: 2015-02-24 04:33:19 [UTC]
Continent: Indonesian Archipelago
Country: Malaysia
State/Prov.: ,
Location: Nationwide,
City:

Event location map
Description:
“One person dying each day from dengue with the casualties already at 44 as of mid-February this year is enough for a national emergency to be declared.” DAP lawmaker Charles Santiago has urged the government to declare a national emergency in combating the dengue pandemic. He said the current situation was something “that the country had not seen before”. “There have been 74,335 dengue cases with 143 deaths as of September last year. In comparison to just 21,900 cases with 35 deaths in 2012. “Statistics show 43,346 cases with 92 deaths in 2013,” he said in a press statement. He said it was clear that the dengue outbreak in Malaysia is fast approaching pandemic and record breaking levels. “The federal government must therefore declare a national emergency and immediately launch a dengue fever emergency control operations, which include international vectors, vector community workers, employment of senior tropical medicine experts and engaging the World Health Organisation (WHO) to undertake disease surveillance and outbreak investigations. “This effort would also need active collaboration of federal and state agencies such as district health departments and district health networks plus NGOs to control the dengue outbreak and prevent epidemics. He said sufficient facilities needed to be readily available to combat the pandemic. “It has been reported that both government and private hospitals do not have enough beds to accommodate patients. It is therefore extremely crucial to ensure that there is adequate supply of essential materials including hospital beds, drugs, rapid diagnostic tests and preventive materials.” Santiago also urged the Federal government, through state health authorities, to make more allocation for regular foggings to be carried out in dengue hot spots. “That as well as periodic foggings must be carried out to prevent dengue in other areas.rnrn”Hefty fines should be meted out to those who are found to be creating a ‘breeding haven’ for Aedes mosquitoes.” He said dengue had in the past one year, brought the worst out of Malaysia, in terms of its disaster management capabilities. “The government seems to have failed to learn from dengue outbreaks in the recent past, costing many lives in the process. “At a minimum of 426 cases a day this year, the threat cannot be taken lightly.” He added that the Selangor government, despite all its efforts, was unable to contain the crisis, with 57% of the total cases taking place in the state. “Selangor is the worst affected state with 10,000 cases compared with 2,020 cases in Perak, 1,024 in Johor and 923 in Kuala Lumpur. “The Selangor state government must prioritize combating dengue in the state exco meeting ahead of other policy matters at least until the epidemic shows improvement. “This will include directing all local councils including relevant Federal and state agencies to take proactive measures like eradicating Aedes mosquito breeding sites and regular inspections of potential mosquito breeding sites”. He said the Federal government should allocate more financial resources towards effective dengue combating programmes. “All districts, through the local councils, should have in place an emergency intervention unit to focus principally on combating the dengue outbreak and see to it that industrial areas keep up to a proper standard in environmental cleanliness. “State health authorities should also allocate adequate number of healthcare workers to attend to the healthcare needs of dengue victims. “If possible, a dedicated dengue epidemic directorate should be formed under the purview of state health department to monitor the dengue situation while trying to identify the dengue hot spot areas.

The name of Hazard: Dengue Fever (outbreak)
Species: Human
Status: Confirmed

Posted:2015-02-24 04:33:19 [UTC]